Kyle and Landon "Passage."

The final features of the painting have been completed. My last step will be to apply glazes, these glazes will enhance and suppress different parts of the painting to further balance the composition.

Kyle and Landon "Passage."

I selected the color scheme for Kyle and Landon's attire. I want Landon's tie to match the color of his Kyle's shirt. The use of color is used to establish the link between father and son. Landon's accurate skin and eye coloring and freckles were added today.

Kyle and Landon "Passage."

I begin to introduce oil paint that is applied to my acrylic underpainting. In this process I pay much more attention to color and details. My models are called in once again so that I can refine my palette for the skin and hair tones.

Kyle and Landon "Passage."

The composition is transferred to canvas using charcoal, then fixed in place with a thin acrylic wash. Once this is done blocking takes place using a mixture of Raw Umber, Cerulean Blue, Burnt Sienna and Titanium White acrylics for the foreground and the mirror.

Kyle and Landon "Passage."

The fourth in my mirror series begins with a sketch. I position my models and establish the lighting then Photograph them. Once reference photos are taken I cut, then move the subjects to make for a better composition.

Flowing Water Final

When I first created the Amoeba frame, I realized that it called for a very specific picture to reside within the circle. That is when I decided to paint a picture of flowing water, which is the source of all life and the home of all kinds of amoebas. Thus began my painting "Flowing Water".

Below I have added the framed painting and the painting sans frame. 

I added a gold foil around the rim of the frame.

I added a gold foil around the rim of the frame.

This is the final painting with oil paints overlaying the original watercolor painting.

This is the final painting with oil paints overlaying the original watercolor painting.

While working on the watercolor painting, I was amazed with the variety of color in each rock and even within the reflections that sat upon the surface of the water. How marvelous it is to observe and meditate on even the smallest things that we take for granted.

Flowing Water flowing

I need a few more hours to complete painting the rocks beneath the water. Once that is done, I'll lay in the reflections that will give the final illusion of water, where water meets air. Using the "huile" paper has been a little challenging, but it also has provided advantages too, by being able to lift color almost completely off the paper. I will explore using oil paint over the water color under painting, this has been the purpose of using this multi-media paper.

Flow river flow, let your waters wash down

Watching the water flow over and between the rocks, causing submerged leaves to wriggle and wave is a calming experience. Sitting and watching, I begin to notice the myriad of colors that are revealed in the rocks and shards, and am hypnotized by the sheer beauty. While painting water with watercolors the experience begins to come back to me in a timeless exhale of calm. Below are the beginning stages for my painting of "Flowing Water".

Here the colors reveal themselves.

Here the colors reveal themselves.

The pencil drawing now in place, awaits colorizing,

The pencil drawing now in place, awaits colorizing,

Painting from the source (photo), that is . . .

Painting from the source (photo), that is . . .

Flowing Water

I have always been fascinated how water which is basically clear, refracts light and affects what is beneath the surface. The reflections on the surface of the water let you know of the water's presence.

This is the photo that I took as my reference.

This is the photo that I took as my reference.

After cutting out a circle from a piece of vellum, I divided the image into 4 sections, and began to draw each section one at a time.

After cutting out a circle from a piece of vellum, I divided the image into 4 sections, and began to draw each section one at a time.

I am using a frame that I created previously to fit over the new painting.

I am using a frame that I created previously to fit over the new painting.

Here you see three out of the final four sections of my preliminary drawing on Arches huile paper. This paper can accept a variety of mediums including watercolor and oil paints.

Here you see three out of the final four sections of my preliminary drawing on Arches huile paper. This paper can accept a variety of mediums including watercolor and oil paints.

Almost done

I'm at the final stage of the painting. At this point I will refine the colors and forms, and then add a few more details.

Scroll Prev/Next to see the various stages of development all the way from the original thumbnail sketch.

On with the blouses

Today I added the blouses as well as softening some edges and laying down a few dark glazes.

Scroll previous and next to see the various stages of development all the way from the original thumbnail sketch.

Maddie's skirt, limbs and mirror

The painting is beginning to fill in and the blocking is taking on form. The models came in for a 2nd sitting where I refined the skin tones, shading and shadows that are defined by the lighting in the studio.

9Madi, skirt, limbs and mirror.jpg

Nina's hair and hand

Moving forward with the skin tones and the hair texture and values, I have blocked in Nina's arm and given her left hand more form and definition. In addition I have begun to lighten her and Madi's hair.

Nina's hair and hand

Blocking in Nina and Maddie

The following photos are showing the progress of the portrait of Nina and Madi. The main shapes have been blocked in by color and value, now the faces are beginning to be formed.

Toned background
Added Madi's face
detail of Madi's face
Added Nina's face defining form of arm

Sketch for the composition of the painting

A rough sketch for my idea began as a very simple Thumbnail drawing of a mother grooming her daughter. This was done in one of my small sketchbooks.

Thumbnail drawing using ballpoint

After deciding the final size of the painting, I sketched a scaled down version of the portrait that was to be painted.

Sketch to scale

I wanted to maintain a theme where I use the same mirror from a previous portrait done of my friend Nancy.

Nancy reflected in the mirror

Nancy reflected in the mirror

Studies of the subjects for my portrait

Before beginning any portrait, I practice drawing the faces using pencil or charcoal. Doing this I can anticipate the values and textures before applying color, and this process really helps in understanding the forms of my subjects features.

child

Transferring the sketch to the canvas and then blocking in the values

The first step in the painting is to transfer the sketch to the canvas, and then to block in the color values. This step is done in acrylic which is quick drying and easy to correct.

I have used a Cerulean blue, mixed with Orange to lower the intensity. I do this to cool down the shadows and the image in the mirror. This will help with the contrast when I add the warmer skin tones.